Could this be the best Herondale Farm meat CSA month ever?
This month’s bag was full of everything I love. It’s like the goddess of meat owed me fifteen pounds of payback. 

A bitch just collected, son! (poster from Deviant Art.)
Here are my recipe picks for the April meat share.
Beef short ribs
One of my favorite cuts of any animal.  My bag had nearly four pounds of bone-in short ribs; cooking them bone-in provides for an incredibly rich sauce that is, not surprisingly, also terrifically good for you.
I’ve got oven *and* crock pot options for you.
1. OVEN: Short ribs braised in ancho chile and coffee sauce. I’ve made this at least 20 times. I love it.
2. CROCK POT/OVEN adaption: Five-spice short ribs. Charlotte adapted a crock pot recipe for the oven. Two methods for the price of one!
3. CROCK POT CERTIFIED PALEO: Slow-cooker Korean short ribs from NomNomPaleo. This, friends, is what I’ll be doing with my short ribs. The recipe is dump-and-go, for one thing, and she provides all the substitutions right up front. Killer.
4. GOURMET OVEN option: Here’s a complex recipe with advanced ingredients and techniques, but highly rated.
5. OVEN method, Provencale flavors: If you love herbes de Provence, olives, wine and tomatoes, this is the recipe for you. Just leave the flour out - you won’t tell the difference.
Beef Stew Meat
I’ve become very attached to this beef stew recipe, which is potato-less and illegally tasty:
1. OVEN: Hearty beef stew with green peas and carrots 
When I make it, I just leave the flour out.
2. SLOW COOKER PALEO: Garlic beef stew (with bonus savory cauliflower mash). This is from Sarah Fragoso at Everyday Paleo.
Ground Beef
We’ve worked our way through chili, white-trash tacos, picadillo and bacon-filled meatloaf.
My super-quick ground beef secret is that I love to make a batch of burgers by simply defrosting the tube of ground beef, pulling off fistfuls of meat, making them into patties, salting them, and frying them, naked, in a skillet. I make a huge pile of burgers, perfectly medium-rare, then stack them in Tupperware and heat them up at work one at a time, always with a big pile of ketchup on the side. Everybody always looks on enviously when I eat them.
As good as that is, I am looking for a challenge.
1. Pastelón - this is the Puerto Rican/Dominican “lasagne” that is made with ripe plantains, otherwise known as the most perfect food ever bequeathed to humankind. Yes, it contains dairy. No, I haven’t yet convinced Ben @ Bierkraft to share his Paleo version of this recipe, but I’m confident I can do so. In the meantime, here’s a version I’m on fire to try.

via TheNoshery
2. Paleo Comfort Foods’ Farmer Pie - the photos show a disturbingly purple coating of cauliflower here. When I make it, I’ll use white or orange cauliflower, both of which are easier to find and more visually enticing.
Ham Steak
I’ve got an SOS call in to Herondale to get some advice on this tricky cut.
Leg of Lamb
What a beautiful cut.

via Lamb Philly
First of all, let me say that I like my lamb medium-rare, at most. If you insist on cooking it harder than that, you are dead to me.
That means I roast it until its internal temperature, taken with a meat thermometer, is 120-125 degrees. After resting, it’ll register 130-135, and still have a beautiful, juicy pink glow.
Secondly, I presume that lamb roasts should be covered by a mixture of garlic + 1 herb, either rosemary or thyme. Using both is distracting. One at a time is just right. Freely substitute one for the other in any given recipe.
1. Leg of lamb with garlic and rosemary
2. Roast leg of lamb with olive and rosemary paste
3. No-recipe guide for lamb roasts: Coat with your favorite spice/garlic rub, then roast uncovered at 400 for 20  minutes per (uncooked) pound. 
There were a bunch of other staples in my bag; sirloin steak (my favorite!) and a juicy Porterhouse; a pack of bacon, and  a pack of Italian sausage. We know what to do with these cuts. We have the technology.
And that, friends, is the April edition of KCAEP. If you have questions about the recipes in this post, or would like to share your success stories, please hit me up in the comments.
Happy cooking!

Could this be the best Herondale Farm meat CSA month ever?

This month’s bag was full of everything I love. It’s like the goddess of meat owed me fifteen pounds of payback. 

A bitch just collected, son! (poster from Deviant Art.)

Here are my recipe picks for the April meat share.

Beef short ribs

One of my favorite cuts of any animal.  My bag had nearly four pounds of bone-in short ribs; cooking them bone-in provides for an incredibly rich sauce that is, not surprisingly, also terrifically good for you.

I’ve got oven *and* crock pot options for you.

1. OVEN: Short ribs braised in ancho chile and coffee sauce. I’ve made this at least 20 times. I love it.

2. CROCK POT/OVEN adaption: Five-spice short ribs. Charlotte adapted a crock pot recipe for the oven. Two methods for the price of one!

3. CROCK POT CERTIFIED PALEO: Slow-cooker Korean short ribs from NomNomPaleo. This, friends, is what I’ll be doing with my short ribs. The recipe is dump-and-go, for one thing, and she provides all the substitutions right up front. Killer.

4. GOURMET OVEN option: Here’s a complex recipe with advanced ingredients and techniques, but highly rated.

5. OVEN method, Provencale flavors: If you love herbes de Provence, olives, wine and tomatoes, this is the recipe for you. Just leave the flour out - you won’t tell the difference.

Beef Stew Meat

I’ve become very attached to this beef stew recipe, which is potato-less and illegally tasty:

1. OVEN: Hearty beef stew with green peas and carrots 

When I make it, I just leave the flour out.

2. SLOW COOKER PALEO: Garlic beef stew (with bonus savory cauliflower mash). This is from Sarah Fragoso at Everyday Paleo.

Ground Beef

We’ve worked our way through chili, white-trash tacos, picadillo and bacon-filled meatloaf.

My super-quick ground beef secret is that I love to make a batch of burgers by simply defrosting the tube of ground beef, pulling off fistfuls of meat, making them into patties, salting them, and frying them, naked, in a skillet. I make a huge pile of burgers, perfectly medium-rare, then stack them in Tupperware and heat them up at work one at a time, always with a big pile of ketchup on the side. Everybody always looks on enviously when I eat them.

As good as that is, I am looking for a challenge.

1. Pastelón - this is the Puerto Rican/Dominican “lasagne” that is made with ripe plantains, otherwise known as the most perfect food ever bequeathed to humankind. Yes, it contains dairy. No, I haven’t yet convinced Ben @ Bierkraft to share his Paleo version of this recipe, but I’m confident I can do so. In the meantime, here’s a version I’m on fire to try.

via TheNoshery

2. Paleo Comfort Foods’ Farmer Pie - the photos show a disturbingly purple coating of cauliflower here. When I make it, I’ll use white or orange cauliflower, both of which are easier to find and more visually enticing.

Ham Steak

I’ve got an SOS call in to Herondale to get some advice on this tricky cut.

Leg of Lamb

What a beautiful cut.

via Lamb Philly

First of all, let me say that I like my lamb medium-rare, at most. If you insist on cooking it harder than that, you are dead to me.

That means I roast it until its internal temperature, taken with a meat thermometer, is 120-125 degrees. After resting, it’ll register 130-135, and still have a beautiful, juicy pink glow.

Secondly, I presume that lamb roasts should be covered by a mixture of garlic + 1 herb, either rosemary or thyme. Using both is distracting. One at a time is just right. Freely substitute one for the other in any given recipe.

1. Leg of lamb with garlic and rosemary

2. Roast leg of lamb with olive and rosemary paste

3. No-recipe guide for lamb roasts: Coat with your favorite spice/garlic rub, then roast uncovered at 400 for 20  minutes per (uncooked) pound. 

There were a bunch of other staples in my bag; sirloin steak (my favorite!) and a juicy Porterhouse; a pack of bacon, and  a pack of Italian sausage. We know what to do with these cuts. We have the technology.

And that, friends, is the April edition of KCAEP. If you have questions about the recipes in this post, or would like to share your success stories, please hit me up in the comments.

Happy cooking!

Recent comments

Blog comments powered by Disqus

5 Notes

  1. nomnomnomnomzieaturcatz reblogged this from thedailypaleo
  2. thedailypaleo posted this