The April meat share from the Crossfit South Brooklyn/Herondale Farm CSA was delivered last night, and holy cow did we hit the jackpot.
Many of my favorite cuts were included, and below I offer a recap of the recipes I’ve made with them.
Beef short ribs

1. Short ribs provencale (oven method)
2. Short ribs braised in ancho-coffee sauce (oven method)
3. Slow cooker Korean short ribs (crock pot)
4. Charlotte K’s Asian short ribs (oven method)
And if you’re a taco lover, you might try this:
5. Short rib tacos with chimichurri sauce
Beef shanks (aka cross-cut shanks)
Like bone-in short ribs, shanks need to be braised (cooked long and slow with a lot of liquid.) But the payoff is immense; the meat is delicious and tender. If you don’t have enough shanks for a recipe (you’ll need more than 2), either wait til you receive more, or supplement from your local butcher.
This is one my very, very, very favorite recipes for any beef cut:
1. Peppered beef shanks in red wine (crock pot)

2. One of the many yummy things I did not eat on my Dominican vacation because the food was all Russian Immigrant Steamtable: Dominican sancocho
3. Butterflied leg of lamb
This was me when I saw the lamb in my bag:


I really, really love this cut. Especially grilled. But since I don’t have access to a grill year-round, I make it in the oven most of the time.
You can rub any manner of spices on lamb; it loves Mediterranean flavors (any combination of garlic, thyme, oregano, rosemary, and lemon) as well as the classic flavor pairing of mint. It’s also a good friend to both Middle Eastern and North African flavor profiles. 
Basic method: 1. Marinate overnight. 2. Roast. 3. Profit.
I strongly suggest you acquire a meat thermometer if you’re a beginner with roasting large cuts of meat. Eventually you will stop needing it, but it’s a very useful learning tool. I personally like my lamb rare so I take it out at 125 or so, and then let it rest,  but you should play around with that.
Here’s a straightforward recipe from Serious Eats. Here’s another basic one from Epicurious; if you don’t eat white potatoes, simply substitute sweet potatoes.
So that’s it for this month. Any CBSBK/Herondale CSA members who haven’t signed up to continue past April - contact the Farm now before all the slots fill up! Email info@herondalefarm.com.

The April meat share from the Crossfit South Brooklyn/Herondale Farm CSA was delivered last night, and holy cow did we hit the jackpot.

Many of my favorite cuts were included, and below I offer a recap of the recipes I’ve made with them.

Beef short ribs

1. Short ribs provencale (oven method)

2. Short ribs braised in ancho-coffee sauce (oven method)

3. Slow cooker Korean short ribs (crock pot)

4. Charlotte K’s Asian short ribs (oven method)

And if you’re a taco lover, you might try this:

5. Short rib tacos with chimichurri sauce

Beef shanks (aka cross-cut shanks)

Like bone-in short ribs, shanks need to be braised (cooked long and slow with a lot of liquid.) But the payoff is immense; the meat is delicious and tender. If you don’t have enough shanks for a recipe (you’ll need more than 2), either wait til you receive more, or supplement from your local butcher.

This is one my very, very, very favorite recipes for any beef cut:

1. Peppered beef shanks in red wine (crock pot)

2. One of the many yummy things I did not eat on my Dominican vacation because the food was all Russian Immigrant Steamtable: Dominican sancocho

3. Butterflied leg of lamb

This was me when I saw the lamb in my bag:

I really, really love this cut. Especially grilled. But since I don’t have access to a grill year-round, I make it in the oven most of the time.

You can rub any manner of spices on lamb; it loves Mediterranean flavors (any combination of garlic, thyme, oregano, rosemary, and lemon) as well as the classic flavor pairing of mint. It’s also a good friend to both Middle Eastern and North African flavor profiles. 

Basic method: 1. Marinate overnight. 2. Roast. 3. Profit.

I strongly suggest you acquire a meat thermometer if you’re a beginner with roasting large cuts of meat. Eventually you will stop needing it, but it’s a very useful learning tool. I personally like my lamb rare so I take it out at 125 or so, and then let it rest,  but you should play around with that.

Here’s a straightforward recipe from Serious Eats. Here’s another basic one from Epicurious; if you don’t eat white potatoes, simply substitute sweet potatoes.

So that’s it for this month. Any CBSBK/Herondale CSA members who haven’t signed up to continue past April - contact the Farm now before all the slots fill up! Email info@herondalefarm.com.

Meat you can eat with a spoon! Cross-cut beef shanks from the Herondale Farm meat CSA.
Recipe adapted from thekitchn.com. I removed the toxic ingredients (vegetable oil, euw), corrected the meat ration (no main course for multiple people should have less than 2 lbs raw meat) and added other clarifications.
Slow Cooker Peppered Beef Shank in Red Wineserves 4 to 6 3-5 as a main course, depending on how much meat you start with
3 to 5 pounds beef crosscut shank, fat trimmed away (I used 3 shanks; note that the weight includes the bones)Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepperVegetable or peanut oil Olive oil10 to 12 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped2 medium yellow onions, peeled and roughly chopped1 large stalk celery, roughly chopped (or one large carrot)1 bay leaf1 rosemary sprig750 ml bottle inexpensive red wine 4 cups beef or chicken broth (beef is best, chicken will do)2-3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (don’t skip this)
Method
1. Bring the defrosted shanks out of the fridge, cut them out of the packaging, and dry them thoroughly.
2. Prep your vegetables.
3. Heat a wide, heavy skillet (cast iron or enameled cast iron ( I used a Le Crueset dutch oven) over medium heat and coat the bottom of it with olive oil.
4. Liberally salt and pepper the shanks and sear them in a single layer until both sides of each piece of meat have a dark crust.

5. Remove the meat to the slow cooker, put the lid on, and set aside.
6. On the stove, turn the heat down to low and put the vegetables into the same pan. Cook at least 15 minutes, scraping up the fond, until the onions begin to color. 
7. Add bay leaf, rosemary, red wine and broth to the pot, bring to a boil, them simmer for 15-20 min, until about 1/3 reduced.
8. Carefully pour that over the meat in the slow cooker, add the balsamic, and cook on LOW for at least 8 hours. I cooked today’s batch for 12.
9. Let the dish cool a bit in the slow cooker before you try to handle it. 
10. With a slotted spoon, carefully remove the meat and bones; make sure you get the marrow chunks (which may have slipped out) because they are delicious. Once the marrow is rescued from the bones, remove them from the dish. Clean them to use for stock.
11. Pour the sauce through a sieve or strainer, discarding the solids, if you’re fancy. Ignore the straining if you’re not.
12. Chill the meat and sauce separately. Skim the congealed fat off the sauce after chilling.
13. Reheat meat+sauce together. Taste for salt before serving.

Meat you can eat with a spoon! Cross-cut beef shanks from the Herondale Farm meat CSA.

Recipe adapted from thekitchn.com. I removed the toxic ingredients (vegetable oil, euw), corrected the meat ration (no main course for multiple people should have less than 2 lbs raw meat) and added other clarifications.

Slow Cooker Peppered Beef Shank in Red Wine
serves 4 to 6 3-5 as a main course, depending on how much meat you start with

3 to 5 pounds beef crosscut shank, fat trimmed away (I used 3 shanks; note that the weight includes the bones)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Vegetable or peanut oil Olive oil
10 to 12 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
2 medium yellow onions, peeled and roughly chopped
1 large stalk celery, roughly chopped (or one large carrot)
1 bay leaf
1 rosemary sprig
750 ml bottle inexpensive red wine 
4 cups beef or chicken broth (beef is best, chicken will do)
2-3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (don’t skip this)

Method

1. Bring the defrosted shanks out of the fridge, cut them out of the packaging, and dry them thoroughly.

2. Prep your vegetables.

3. Heat a wide, heavy skillet (cast iron or enameled cast iron ( I used a Le Crueset dutch oven) over medium heat and coat the bottom of it with olive oil.

4. Liberally salt and pepper the shanks and sear them in a single layer until both sides of each piece of meat have a dark crust.

IMG_3313

5. Remove the meat to the slow cooker, put the lid on, and set aside.

6. On the stove, turn the heat down to low and put the vegetables into the same pan. Cook at least 15 minutes, scraping up the fond, until the onions begin to color. 

7. Add bay leaf, rosemary, red wine and broth to the pot, bring to a boil, them simmer for 15-20 min, until about 1/3 reduced.

8. Carefully pour that over the meat in the slow cooker, add the balsamic, and cook on LOW for at least 8 hours. I cooked today’s batch for 12.

9. Let the dish cool a bit in the slow cooker before you try to handle it. 

10. With a slotted spoon, carefully remove the meat and bones; make sure you get the marrow chunks (which may have slipped out) because they are delicious. Once the marrow is rescued from the bones, remove them from the dish. Clean them to use for stock.

11. Pour the sauce through a sieve or strainer, discarding the solids, if you’re fancy. Ignore the straining if you’re not.

12. Chill the meat and sauce separately. Skim the congealed fat off the sauce after chilling.

13. Reheat meat+sauce together. Taste for salt before serving.