day 3 wrap-up: four meats

today i reaped the rewards of a weekend of planning and cooking. 

breakfast

lunch

  • leftover meatloaf
  • apple

snack

  • beef jerky

dinner

  • homemade amazeballs chicken broth*
  • lamb shanks from yesterday
  • japanese sweet potato sauteed in duck fat**
  • small tangerine

*finest chicken broth i’ve ever made -so obvious that long simmering matters. this broth simmered overnight; i strained and refrigerated in the morning, then skimmed it quickly tonight, reheated a bowlful, and seasoned with salt and pepper. 

**holy. mother. of our lord and saviour. these were pre-steamed (already cooked) so i only had to crisp them in the CanardCream of perfection. i’m so in love.

    day 2 wrap-up

    I’m sickly today, so that bone broth I was planning to make got bumped up in my schedule. I conveniently got it started just in time to keep my fool self up all night tending it.

    Breakfast

    Midday

    • leftover meatloaf

    Snack

    • small handful mixed unsalted nuts
    • Golden Nepal tea from McNulty’s

    Dinner

    • Braised lamb shanks, hold the white beans and gremolata*
    • Yes, I made a twice-strained pan sauce for myself. I’m worth it.
    • small Japanese sweet potato   

    On the stove now

    *Avi asked me about butter being Paleo; it’s in the pan sauce that finishes the lamb shank dish. 

    First of all, monter au buerre is the single technique that pretty much perfectly describes my cooking style, so I’m not giving that shit up just to say I’m eating Paleo. 

    Second, you can produce a kindler, gentler (on your body) butter by clarifying it first; when you do so, you strain out the proteins that are most likely to give you trouble.

    Finally, the butter I buy is grass-fed and incredibly delicious. It’s practically medicinal before you even open the package. Once you stir that shit into a big pot of burbling animal collagen, you are basically buying yourself 10-20 extra years on this planet.

    That’s how I feel about butter.

    feel better, bitches.

via Weston A. Price:
Beef Stock
about 4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones1 calves foot, cut into pieces (optional)3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones4 or more quarts cold filtered water1/2 cup vinegar3 onions, coarsely chopped3 carrots, coarsely chopped3 celery stalks, coarsely choppedseveral sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns, crushedl bunch parsley
Place the knuckle and marrow bones and optional calves foot in a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let stand for one hour. Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven. When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables. Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices. Add this liquid to the pot. Add additional water, if necessary, to cover the bones; but the liquid should come no higher than within one inch of the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking. Bring to a boil. A large amount of scum will come to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns.
Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes. You will now have a pot of rather repulsive-looking brown liquid containing globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It doesn’t even smell particularly good. But don’t despair. After straining you will have a delicious and nourishing clear broth that forms the basis for many other recipes in this book.
Remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon. Strain the stock into a large bowl. Let cool in the refrigerator and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top. Transfer to smaller containers and to the freezer for long-term storage.

    feel better, bitches.

    via Weston A. Price:

    Beef Stock

    about 4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones
    1 calves foot, cut into pieces (optional)
    3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones
    4 or more quarts cold filtered water
    1/2 cup vinegar
    3 onions, coarsely chopped
    3 carrots, coarsely chopped
    3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
    several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together
    1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns, crushed
    l bunch parsley

    Place the knuckle and marrow bones and optional calves foot in a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let stand for one hour. Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven. When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables. Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices. Add this liquid to the pot. Add additional water, if necessary, to cover the bones; but the liquid should come no higher than within one inch of the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking. Bring to a boil. A large amount of scum will come to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns.

    Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes. You will now have a pot of rather repulsive-looking brown liquid containing globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It doesn’t even smell particularly good. But don’t despair. After straining you will have a delicious and nourishing clear broth that forms the basis for many other recipes in this book.

    Remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon. Strain the stock into a large bowl. Let cool in the refrigerator and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top. Transfer to smaller containers and to the freezer for long-term storage.

    using the leftover bacon from the meatloaf.

    using the leftover bacon from the meatloaf.

    happy day 1 of the paleo challenge. breakfast: bacon-wrapped meatloaf